August202014

lelaid:

braiker:

bethrevis:

US Constitution, First Amendment: The right to assemble, to have free speech, to have freedom of the press.

Ferguson Police: Kicks out media and limits protestors to a “First Amendment Area”image

funny, i thought the WHOLE COUNTRY was a first amendment area. silly me. 

Funny that when they do this I only hear about it on tumblr, but when they try to limit guns and the second amendment it literally becomes a congressional uproar.

(via little-angelpie)

August142014

To love and kiss, to sweetly hold,
For the dancing and the dreaming.
Through all my sorrows and all nights,
I’ll keep your love inside me.

(Source: fyeahhowtotrainyourdragon, via little-angelpie)

1AM

reportagebygettyimages:

“The building is better than a slum, but it’s still a difficult place to live in. There are no elevators, the water system is deficient, and while electricity is available, if you plug in too many devices, the entire floor shuts down. Also, there are areas without railings, and I’ve been told that drunk people or kids have fallen down in the past.”

-Photographer Alejandro Cegarra, who was awarded the Ian Parry Scholarship for his work on Caracas’s ‘Tower of David.’ The skyscraper was inhabited by thousands of squatters after being abandoned midway through construction. See more on Time Lightbox

1AM
brentdoesartthings:

trappedtrappedtrapped til the cage is full

brentdoesartthings:

trappedtrappedtrapped til the cage is full

(via oitnb)

1AM
worldcafe:


Ever wonder why you love the music of your teenage years the most? 
Great article from Slate explaining the neural science and social reasons why we all feel the way we do. 

The nostalgia that accompanies our favorite songs isn’t just a fleeting recollection of earlier times; it’s a neurological wormhole that gives us a glimpse into the years when our brains leapt with joy at the music that’s come to define us.

worldcafe:

Ever wonder why you love the music of your teenage years the most? 

Great article from Slate explaining the neural science and social reasons why we all feel the way we do. 

The nostalgia that accompanies our favorite songs isn’t just a fleeting recollection of earlier times; it’s a neurological wormhole that gives us a glimpse into the years when our brains leapt with joy at the music that’s come to define us.

1AM
1AM
oitnb:

Thank you for being a friend. #OITNB

oitnb:

Thank you for being a friend. #OITNB

1AM
newsweek:

Since its inception in 1936, the Fields Medal has been awarded to 52 of the most exceptional mathematicians in the world under the age of 40. For the first time, that award has gone to a woman: Maryam Mirzakhani, 37, an Iranian-born mathematician who works at Stanford.
She shared the prize — the highest honor in mathematics — with Martin Hairer, 38, of the University of Warwick, England; Manjul Bhargava, 40, of Princeton; and Arthur Avila, 35, of the National Center for Scientific Research, France.
According to The New York Times, 70% of doctoral degrees in math are awarded to males, making the award to Mirzakhani especially noteworthy. In the related field of physics, only two women have ever won the Nobel Prize. Only one has won in economics.
The Fields was presented by the International Congress of Mathematicians to this year’s four winners in a ceremony in Seoul on Wednesday.
Mirzakhani’s research focuses on “understanding the symmetry of curved surfaces, such as spheres, the surfaces of doughnuts and of hyperbolic objects,” according to a Stanford release. A text provided by the ICM further explains that she works on so-called Riemann surfaces and their deformations. The ICM praised her for “strong geometric intuition.”
A Huge First For Women: Female Mathematician Wins Fields Medal

newsweek:

Since its inception in 1936, the Fields Medal has been awarded to 52 of the most exceptional mathematicians in the world under the age of 40. For the first time, that award has gone to a woman: Maryam Mirzakhani, 37, an Iranian-born mathematician who works at Stanford.

She shared the prize — the highest honor in mathematics — with Martin Hairer, 38, of the University of Warwick, England; Manjul Bhargava, 40, of Princeton; and Arthur Avila, 35, of the National Center for Scientific Research, France.

According to The New York Times, 70% of doctoral degrees in math are awarded to males, making the award to Mirzakhani especially noteworthy. In the related field of physics, only two women have ever won the Nobel Prize. Only one has won in economics.

The Fields was presented by the International Congress of Mathematicians to this year’s four winners in a ceremony in Seoul on Wednesday.

Mirzakhani’s research focuses on “understanding the symmetry of curved surfaces, such as spheres, the surfaces of doughnuts and of hyperbolic objects,” according to a Stanford release. A text provided by the ICM further explains that she works on so-called Riemann surfaces and their deformations. The ICM praised her for “strong geometric intuition.”

A Huge First For Women: Female Mathematician Wins Fields Medal

1AM
1AM
newsweek:

Much of Iraq is now in chaos, and fighters from the Islamic State, formerly known as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), are fueling the instability, attacking towns at will and making large gains in territory. 

Last week, IS militants swarmed into several minority villages in northern Iraq, prompting tens of thousands of Yazidis and Christians to flee for their lives during their push toward the Kurdish regional capital of Arbil. 

Iraq’s human rights minister told Reuters that IS militants have killed at least 500 members of Iraq’s Yazidi ethnic minority during their offensive. U.S. warplanes bombed IS fighters and weapons on Friday after President Barack Obama said Washington must act to prevent “genocide”. 

At least 20,000 civilians who had been besieged by jihadists on Sinjar mountain have safely escaped to Syria and been escorted by Kurdish forces back into Iraq, officials said. 

Thousands more are still feared to be trapped in the region, forced to choose between starvation and dehydration, or a descent down the mountains toward armed militants.

Desperate Iraqi Minorities Flee ISIS Attacks - In Focus - The Atlantic

newsweek:

Much of Iraq is now in chaos, and fighters from the Islamic State, formerly known as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), are fueling the instability, attacking towns at will and making large gains in territory.

Last week, IS militants swarmed into several minority villages in northern Iraq, prompting tens of thousands of Yazidis and Christians to flee for their lives during their push toward the Kurdish regional capital of Arbil.

Iraq’s human rights minister told Reuters that IS militants have killed at least 500 members of Iraq’s Yazidi ethnic minority during their offensive. U.S. warplanes bombed IS fighters and weapons on Friday after President Barack Obama said Washington must act to prevent “genocide”.

At least 20,000 civilians who had been besieged by jihadists on Sinjar mountain have safely escaped to Syria and been escorted by Kurdish forces back into Iraq, officials said.

Thousands more are still feared to be trapped in the region, forced to choose between starvation and dehydration, or a descent down the mountains toward armed militants.

Desperate Iraqi Minorities Flee ISIS Attacks - In Focus - The Atlantic

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